SHAME 2.0

With Comments from the Populace
A WORLD PREMIERE WORKSHOP PRODUCTION
Adapted by Einat Weizman from the original SHAME
by Einat Weizman with Morad Hassan
Directed by John Vreeke
At the Atlas Performing Arts Center, Lang Theatre
Part of the Voices from a Changing Middle East Festival
January 30—February 17

ABOUT

Hate mail. Death threats. Intimidation. Incarceration. Artists under siege and house arrest. This is happening. Now. This is Shame 2.0, a blistering, documentary portrait ripped right from today’s headlines. As Israelis and Palestinians work together in the face of government censorship, cultural suppression, and Loyalty Oaths, we see the costs on embattled artists in a conflict-ridden region unfold onstage. Part of Mosaic Theater’s 18th annual Voices From A Changing Middle East Festival, Shame 2.0 integrates live readings of actual Facebook messages, tweets, and voicemails to punctuate the raw, true story of Einat Weizman and Morad Hassan as they strive to make art a tool for cultural resistance. It is a gripping snapshot of now, written in realtime.

 

“Succeeds in creating a shared space where Jewish Israeli and Palestinian citizens and theatre spectators can pay attention profoundly to what’s happening in their society and are probed to give attention to address issues that are often suppressed.” — Contemporary Art Practices in the Middle East

 

DATES

indicates a post show discussion immediately following the performance
*

ACCESSIBILITY

WEEKDAY MATINÉES

8pm Friday, February 15

ASL Interpreted Performance, Open Captioned Performance

​​

3pm Saturday, February 16

ASL Interpreted Performance, Open Captioned Performance

ASL Interpreted Post-Show Discussion

​​

8pm Saturday, February 16

Open Captioned Performance

11am Thursday, February 14

(with post-show discussion)

 
 

ARTISTS

Click the images for more information on each artist

Einat Weizman
Playwright
John Vreeke
Director
Morad Hassan
as Morad Hassan
Colleen Delany
as Einat Weizman
Lynette Rathnam
as Miri Regev
Jonathan Dahm Robertson
Set Designer
Brittany Shemuga
Lighting Designer
Brandee Mathies
Costume Designer
Dylan Uremovich
Projections Designer
David Lamont Wilson
Sound Designer 
Robert Garner
Sound Engineer
Laurel VanLandingham
Production Stage Manager
Joan Cummins
Dramaturg

DISCUSSIONS

8PM THURSDAY, JANUARY 31
The Creative Process

Einat Weizman Playwright/Activist
Morad Hassan Actor/Playwright/Activist
Joan Cummins Production Dramaturg

8PM SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

Crafting the Story in Documentary Theater
Sybil R. Williams Director of African American and African Diaspora Studies Department of Performing Arts, American University
Einat Weizman Playwright/Activist
Derek Goldman Co-Director, Laboratory for Global Performance and Politics, Georgetown University
Joan Cummins Production Dramaturg

8PM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5

The Wild, Wild, Webs: Truths and Lies of the Internet

Einat Weizman Playwright/Activist

Jane Hall Associate professor of Journalism and Media Studies at the School of Communication at American University; former journalist for the Los Angeles Times; and media commentator

Joan Cummins Production Dramaturg

8PM WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6

The Great Schism: American Jews and Israeli Dilemmas in Miri Regev’s World

Scott Lasensky Foreign policy advisor in Obama Administration diplomat, professor, and writer

Neha Sahgal Associate Director of Research, Religion & Public Life, Pew Research Center

Benjy Cannon Writer, researcher, and activist in Washington DC

Stephen Stern Mosaic Board Member

3PM SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9

Partisan Preferences: How the Culture Wars Impact Art in the US and Israel

Victoria Murray Baatin Mosaic Associate Artistic Director

3PM SUNDAY, FEBRUARY  10

Who Tells the Story? Who Can be Heard? Representation, Tokenization, and Voice

Morad Hassan Actor/Playwright/Activist

Otis Cortez Ramsey-Zöe Dramaturg, Series Editor for NoPassport Press’s Dreaming the Americas Series, Editorial Advisory Board Member for Voice and Speech Review, and doctoral student and University of Maryland

Suhad Babaa Executive Director, Just Vision

Stephen Stern Mosaic Board Member

8PM WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13

Supporting Coalitions for Human Rights and Fighting Cultural Repression—An Evening with New Israel Fund

Tali Herskowitz New Israel Fun Director, Washington Region

Amos Gil Co-founder of Ir Amim; former director of ACRI and of the YMCA in Jerusalem

11AM THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

Cast Talk Back

Victoria Murray Baatin Mosaic Associate Artistic Director

8PM THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

The Palestinian Experience: Within and Beyond the Green Line

Morad Hassan Actor/Playwright/Activist

Nizar Faraskh Chair of the Board of The Museum of the Palestinian People

3PM SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Limited Expression: Political Censorship of Political Art

Marcus K. Dowling Journalist, broadcaster, and entrepreneur

David Shipler Author, Freedom of Speech: Mightier Than the Sword

Jez Kline Mosaic Marketing Director

 

BACKGROUND

from the DRAMATURG

Shame connotes hiddenness—it is an emotion we feel when we have done something wrongful we want to hide from others, or when we have discovered something about the world that is wrong and has been hidden from us.

 

The way to begin to process shame, or to make right what is shameful, is to bring it to light: to tell another person the truth. This applies equally to individual people and to a society at large.

Einat describes her work as an effort to reveal what is hidden. Increasingly vocal in her activist art, she creates theater that reveals the experience of Palestinians under occupation, whether they be prisoners writing letters to their families, ordinary people whose homes have been drilled into rubble, or poets bearing up under stifling house arrest. She works to reveal the system that perpetrates injustice, and the humanity of the people under its thumb.

Morad just wants to be seen. He wants to appear onstage, of course, and is incredibly passionate about the craft of acting, but he also wants to be seen and recognized as equally valuable as the Israelis he lives and works alongside. He is committed to making both great art and a more equitable society. He wants others to recognize him as just as human as the rest of us.

Miri Regev’s presence, added to the play for the American production, asks us to examine not only the government’s role in arts funding and censorship, but also our own unwillingness to see things that challenge our worldview.

The play SHAME seeks to show us the truth as only theater can. It harnesses our collective experience of witnessing to ask difficult questions about art, politics, and the personal. Einat and Morad show us the power of vulnerability and a remarkable steadfastness of purpose.

This play shows us one person experiencing vitriolic online harassment and the professional consequences of her activism and a second navigating an arts career amid systemic racism and tokenization. It also shows us a third person, invoking national pride to politically activate a community feeling unrepresented by elite urbanites. These all ring familiar in the America of early 2019. The play serves as a model of perseverance as we work to make art, to imagine each other complexly, and to seek truth in the world around us.

NEWS ARTICLES

Banned Play on Palestinian Prisoners, Occupation Throws Israeli Theater Festival Into Turmoil—Yair Ashkenazi, Haaretz

Israeli Artists Scolded: Enough About the Occupation, There Are Other Stories in Israel—Yair Ashkenazi, Haaretz

Does the Israeli Playwright Who Celebrates Palestinian Prisoners Support Terrorism?—Yair Ashkenazi, Haaretz

An anguished cadre of Israeli playwrights looks to America to stage its work

—Peter Marks, The Washington Post

In first, Jaffa theater faces cut in state funding because of ‘incitement’
—Sue Surkes, 
The Times of Israel

KAHLON THROWS SUPPORT BEHIND NEW REGEV LOYALTY BILL
—Gil Hofman, Amy Spiro, 
The Jerusalem Post

Miri Regev’s Culture War—Ruth Margalit, The New York Times Magazine

Israel’s War on Culture—Marisa Mazria-Katz, Mairav Zonszein, The New York Review of Books

 

GALLERY